Best Of 2019 Haitian American

L’union Suite Haitian Excellence Best Of 2019: Government & Politics

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Palm Beach County’s new mayor, Mack Bernard, opened his tenure a few weeks ago with a message for President Donald Trump, who was to arrive in the coming hours at his Palm Beach mansion a few miles away. “I would like to let the president know the new mayor of Palm Beach County is not from a s—hole country. He’s from the beautiful island of Haiti,” said Bernard, a Haiti native, repeating the expletive used by the president in January to describe Haiti and some African nations. Bernard’s remarks for Trump came when his fellow commissioners unanimously chose him to be mayor, a ceremonial role. Bernard, a Democrat and former Delray Beach city commissioner, attended Palm Beach County’s public schools, as well as Florida State University as an undergraduate and the University of Florida for law school, and served two terms in the state Legislature. He was elected to the County Commission in 2016. *Typo : Haitian — Source : @sunsentinel #lunionsuite #haitianamerican #caribbean #florida #westpalmbeach #haitianexcellence #blackexcellence

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Haitian American Nancy Metayer, a member of the Broward County Soil and Water Conservation Board, has announced she’ll compete to be the next Mayor of Coral Springs, Florida in a special election March 12. The March 12 election will pick the replacement for Mayor Skip Campbell, who died in October. — Metayer, 31, grew up in Coral Springs and attended Coral Springs Charter School from 6th – 12th grade where she graduated with honors in 2006. She earned an undergraduate degree in Environmental Sciences from Florida A&M University and a graduate degree in Health Science from Johns Hopkins University. — #lunionsuite #haitianamerican #haitian #coralsprings #mayor #haitianexcellence

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Written by Erica Merasse When someone can make a difference in their community, we should applaud them. Meet Nancy Metayer who is running for Coral Springs Mayor and ready to make an impactful change. I had the opportunity to interview her and now you all will get to know a little more about her and her want for change in Coral Springs. — Erica Merasse: Tell Me A Little About Your Background I am a 31-year-old, proud Haitian-American and my parents are both from Haiti. My dad is from Gonaives and my mom is from Port Au Prince. — Erica Merasse: Why Did You Want To Run For Mayor? I say, “Why not”! I saw the opportunity and I saw that my city needed a leader. I remember when I made this decision on Christmas night, I did my research and I felt like Coral Springs needed a change. I thought the vision of the city needed to be fresh and I told myself that 2019 was going to be the year of risks. And to me, there is no losing in this for me. If I win, then I become the mayor of Coral Springs, and if I lose, I feel like little girls or Haitians can look at me and say, “If she can do, I can do it”! — Continue reading on Lunionsuite.com #lunionsuite #haitianamerican #haitian #haitianexcellence

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#HaitianExcellence…… The #Ottawacitizen reports, the Pont Jean-Alfred will span the Petite-Nation River about 20 kilometres east of Lochaber, in the heart of the riding Alfred represented, Quebec’s Toponymy Commission confirmed this week. Haitian born “Jean Alfred devoted a part of his life to build bridges between Quebecers and the Haitian community here,” Minister of Culture Nathalie Roy said in a release this week. “The bridge that bears his name today is located in the heart of the riding he represented for four years,” she said. — Born in Haiti, Alfred went to the University of Ottawa for studies and received a PhD in education. He taught for several years in Haiti and in the Outaouais and was a commissioner on the Des Draveurs commission before he was elected city councillor on the old Gatineau council. Alfred died in 2015. The commemoration announcement was also made to mark Black History Month. __ Source: https://ottawacitizen.com #lunionsuite #thehaitianamerican #haitian #quebec #blackhistory #haitianexcellence

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#HaitianExcellence……. 🇭🇹👩🏽‍⚖️👏🏾 Federal Magistrate Judge Nancy Joseph biological parents, Sufrine and Georges Joseph, left Haiti for a better life in the United States in 1969, the year she turned 1. Years passed before they were able to return to get Nancy and her seven older siblings. During that time, the older kids went to live with an aunt, but Nancy was placed in the care of Uctorieuse Destin. — Nancy Joseph joined her parents in New Jersey in 1976 and became a citizen in 1987 as a college student. Then she went on to graduate from law school at Rutgers and today is a federal magistrate judge in Milwaukee. — Destin, who raised Joseph from age 1 to 8, immigrated to the U.S. in 1981. She was a permanent resident but did not become a citizen. Until now. Destin, 92, passed her citizenship test and was invited to the naturalization ceremony on March 28 in New York where she lives. She knew Joseph planned to attend but had no idea that this grown-up girl she raised would preside at the ceremony. That was a surprise. — "When the proceeding was called to order and I rose to the bench, mom literally froze in place," Joseph said. "Everyone was standing and I said please be seated. Everyone sat except my mom. She went catatonic for a few minutes and literally froze with a smile on her face.” — Continue Reading: Jim Stingl, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel 📸 U.S. District Court Eastern District of New York #lunionsuite #haitianamerican #haitian #newyorkjudge

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Haitian Excellence ✨🇭🇹 On New Year’s Day, the Township of Union, New Jersey held its annual reorganization meeting at Town Hall where newly reelected committeewoman Michele Delisfort was selected as the Township’s new mayor. Delisfort is the first black female mayor in the Township’s history, and the first Haitian female Mayor in the State. — Michele Delisfort began her remarks by acknowledging her family and colleagues. “It is a given that none of us ascends to elected office without the sacrifices and support of others,” she said. “So, I’d like to dedicate this moment to those whose sacrifices and support made it possible for me to appear before you today as the first Black female and first Haitian-American mayor of the great Township of Union.” — Delisfort acknowledged her husband George and sons. “My amazing family has supported my journey in service from the very beginning,” she said, “from my years serving on the Union Planning Board, my first term as Committee person, and now as your Mayor.” — Delisfort said her parents, Guy and Suzette Delisfort, immigrated from Haiti and established their medical practice in Newark, before “choosing the Township of Union as the ideal community in which to raise their children.” — Read more on Lunionsuite.com 📷 Union, New Jersey – Government Facebook Page — #lunionsuite #haitianamerican #unionnewjersey #blackexcellence #haitianexcellence #caribbean

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